Wind

Cape vulture provides inspiration for homegrown vertical-axis wind turbine

www.engineeringnews.co.za/article/cape-vulture-provides-inspiration-for-homegrown-vertical-axis-wind-turbine-2018-09-11
Cape vulture provides inspiration for homegrown vertical-axis wind turbine
Previous Next Brayfoil Technologies founder Robert Bray on how he drew inspiration from the Cape Vulture for his innovative flexible wing invention, which he says could have application in wind turbines, hydro turbines, sail yachts, aeroplanes and automobiles. Video and video editing: Darlene Creamer
EMBED VIDEOPOPUP VIDEO
DOWNLOAD <www.engineeringnews.co.za/attachment.php?aa_id=75934> WATCH ON YOUTUBE
11TH SEPTEMBER 2018
BY: TERENCE CREAMER <www.engineeringnews.co.za/author.php?u_id=13> CREAMER MEDIA EDITOR
A South African start-up has developed a vertical-axis wind-turbine that employs a groundbreaking morphing wing design <www.engineeringnews.co.za/topic/design>, which seeks to mimic the movements of the Cape vulture.
A prototype of the turbine, developed by Brayfoil Technologies <www.engineeringnews.co.za/topic/brayfoil-technologies> in collaboration with WorleyParsons <www.engineeringnews.co.za/topic/worleyparsons>, is currently being tested at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research <www.engineeringnews.co.za/topic/council-for-scientific-and-industrial-research-company>’s (CSIR’s) campus, in Pretoria <www.engineeringnews.co.za/topic/pretoria>. ADVERTISEMENT <www.engineeringnews.co.za/adcentre/rv/en/www/delivery/ck.php?oaparams=2__bannerid=3231__zoneid=420__cb=5cb444de63__oadest=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.reeffuel.co.za%2F%3Futm_source%3Dadvertising%26utm_medium%…>
The solution is the brainchild of architect and entrepreneur *Robert Bray <www.engineeringnews.co.za/topic/robert-bray>*, who developed the flexible-wing concept after studying the flight of Cape Vultures <www.engineeringnews.co.za/topic/cape-vultures> and eagles during visits to the Marakele National Park, in Limpopo.
“Birds have the ability to change the shape of their wings. They are able to flare out and land on the spot, which aircraft <www.engineeringnews.co.za/topic/aircraft>wings can’t do. I focused on how the birds do it and then tried very hard to replicate the idea with a mechanical method,” Bray explains to *Engineering <www.engineeringnews.co.za/topic/engineering> News Online*.