Categories: General News

by Peter

Share

Categories: General News

by Peter

Share

Renewable energy could be light at end of load-shedding tunnel, says SAWEA

15TH SEPTEMBER 2020

BY: DONNA SLATER
CREAMER MEDIA STAFF WRITER AND PHOTOGRAPHER

ARTICLE ENQUIRY      SAVE THIS ARTICLE      EMAIL THIS ARTICLE

FONT SIZE: +

Local wind energy lobby organisation the South African Wind Energy Association (SAWEA) reports that, as South Africa continues to struggle with the crippling effects of prolonged load-shedding, recent indicators point to a “light at the end of the tunnel that is lit by renewable energy”.

As such, the organisation highlights that, within a short week, three key factors happened that will promote renewable energy, going forward.

ADVERTISEMENT

According to SAWEA, these include the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (Nersa) permitting the production of new renewable power, Eskom launching a daily power generation data platform, demonstrating transparency, and Eskom CEO Andre de Ruyter saying that new energy generation sources will need to be clean and green.

SAWEA CEO Ntombifuthi Ntuli is hopeful that, together, these indicators mean that policy and procurement can work hand-in-hand to enable a green power revolution that will support the economic growth that “is so desperately needed in South Africa”.

ADVERTISEMENT

Mineral Resources and Energy Minister Gwede Mantashe reported last week that Nersa has provided its concurrence to a Section 34 Ministerial determination, issued earlier this year, which opened the way for the procurement of 6 800 MW of wind and solar photovoltaic power.

SAWEA warns that South Africa’s continued power crisis is a problem that will keep recurring unless the country executes decisive policy initiatives and implements the 2019 Integrated Resource Plan (IRP).

“It is clear from the 2019 IRP that the new generation capacity should come from low-cost and reliable renewable energy sources, such as wind and other clean power technologies, especially as renewables can be rolled out within a period of 18 to 24 months.

"It is the most feasible option to close the short term capacity gap and give the country a chance to catch its breath,” explains Ntuli.

Further, SAWEA reports that this sentiment seems to be shared by De Ruyter. The organisation says he is reported, in a number of media platforms, to have acknowledged the global shift to renewable energy and that renewable power is cost competitive power, while delivering reduced emissions and jobs.

To this end, the utility has established a Just Energy Transition office, to engage workers and communities, notes SAWEA.

It points out that De Ruyter is also quoted acknowledging the environmental benefits of clean power and that the national utility cannot continue to violate regulations, telling media that, “climate change and the decreasing cost of renewable energy have proven the case for the shift to renewable energy”.

Another victory for the renewables sector, according to SAWEA, is the recent issuing of draft regulations by the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy, which paves the way for municipalities to be able to procure their own power from independent power producers (IPPs).

“Once that regulation is approved, it will open a new market segment for renewable energy procurement,” states SAWEA.

“We have also seen an increased interest from the private sector, particularly the members of the Energy Intensive Users Group, to procure power directly from independent power producers,” confirms Ntuli, who says the industry is ready and eager to help close the energy supply gaps created by Eskom’s reduced energy availability factor and the decommissioning plan tabled in the 2019 IRP. 

STAY IN THE LOOP

Subscribe to our free newsletter.

Business Report 1 July 2012. Optimal Energy chief executive Kobus Meiring is a disappointed man. The company is the developer of South Africa’s electric car but it officially closed on Friday with the loss of about 60 jobs. This follows its failure to get further funding from the government and the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC)... http://www.iol.co.za/business/business-news/why-sa-s-electric-car-is-not-going-anywhere-1.1331580#.T_E37xcjGq8

Related Posts

  • After the Bell: The way people misunderstand renewable power is shocking  (Image: iStock) By Tim Cohen  Follow 13 Dec 2022  2 I can’t get away from the feeling that the constant, relentless defence of coal has a larger agenda somewhere behind it. Listen to this article 0:00 / 6:23 1X BeyondWords How do we comprehend the resistance among […]

  • Opinion: Koeberg life extension could flip switch on half a trillion rands of economic damage Graphic showing coal capacity factors and loadshedding 24TH NOVEMBER 2022 ARTICLE ENQUIRY      SAVE THIS ARTICLE      EMAIL THIS ARTICLE FONT SIZE: –+ In this opinion article, energy analyst and commentator Clyde Mallinson warns that, against the backdrop of persistent and erratic loadshedding, the economic cost of shutting the Koeberg nuclear plant for […]

  • A New Barefoot GuideFrom the Agroecology Series My Food is African Healthy soil, safe foods and diverse diets Télécharger – Français Download – E   A New Barefoot Guide From the Agroecology Series My Food is African Healthy soil, safe foods and diverse diets Télécharger – Français Download – English A publication of The Alliance […]

  •  > This edition | The voluntary carbon markets, explained in three figures        Read the last Dispatch | The dark matter of the emissions universe             Next Dispatch | What to do when portfolios hit the “value-carbon frontier”  Share Tweet Forward Carbon is a new global currency. If we're serious about stopping climate […]